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Be In Control

Posted By: Staff Editor In: Job Seeker - Interview

 

Going into a job interview most of us go down one of two paths when it comes to the question "Is there anything you would like to ask me?" at the end of the interview. Either our minds go blank and we have absolutely nothing we want to ask (at the moment, walking out the door however is a whole different ballgame.) or our mouths start to run a mile a minute with every question possible that we could ask. Which questions are smart questions and which questions turn perspective employers off?


 
 

 
Mashable business chimed in with a smart look at what to ask and what not to ask in a job interview.
 

Stephanie Daniel, senior vice president of career management company Keystone Associates, spoke with us about her thoughts on how job interviewees can take control of their next job interview by asking the right questions. Read on for her thoughts on what to ask and which questions to avoid when it’s your turn to interrogate.

Asking the Right Questions


When the interviewer gives you the opportunity to ask your own questions, be prepared. Daniel recommends that interviewees prepare five to seven questions, with the expectation that there will probably only be time to ask just three. “Keep in mind that some of the questions you might have prepared will be answered during the course of the interview, so it’s always a smart idea to have back-ups,” says Daniel.
“Too many job seekers respond to this standard interview question with the standard ‘safe’ responses,” says Daniel. “‘Will I be hearing from you or should I contact you?’ or ‘Why is this position open?’ In this very competitive job market, job candidates cannot afford to ask safe questions. Candidates must show that they are the best candidate by demonstrating that they are looking out for the needs and interests of the interviewer.”
So, what types of questions should you ask? Daniel suggests considering a few of the following:
“Here’s your opportunity to demonstrate a genuine interest in the day-to-day challenges your future manager is facing, Daniel explains. “By asking this question, the interviewer will start to envision you as an employee and will give you some initial thoughts on how you might help solve their most pressing problems.”
“Asking the interviewer about the most gratifying aspect of the work she or he does helps you better understand what drives them,” Daniel explains. “Drivers include things like making the best product on the market, helping others, making money, curing an illness or creating a hot, new technology, etc. Ask yourself how the interviewer’s drivers align with your own. The answer to the ‘best advice’ question yields valuable insights on what behaviors lead to a successful transition into the company. It gives you clues on what you can do to put your best foot forward in your potential new role vis-à-vis building new relationships, gaining product knowledge, and avoiding potential pitfalls.”
“The ideal qualifications were probably outlined in the job posting,” says Daniel. “But many of these postings are not actually written by the hiring manager. Here’s your chance to directly ask the interviewer what he views as the most important qualities of the successful candidate and why.”
“This question allows you to turn your attention to the interviewer and his most important priorities,” says Daniel. “Is there a particular goal the interviewer has talked about that lines up well with some of your current experiences? If so, let the interviewer know how you can contribute.”
  • Is there a work issue that keeps you up at night and, given what you know about my background, how do you think I could help?
  • What is the most gratifying aspect of the work you do for XYZ company? What’s your best advice to someone starting out at this company?
  • Could you describe your ideal candidate for this job? Why are these qualities important to you?
  • I’m sure you have a number of goals you’d like to achieve in the coming year. Do you have a particular one that is top priority?
Other great questions may revolve around key drivers for employees, what characterizes top performers at the company and whether the interviewer would like to know anything more about the interviewee’s background, says Daniel.

Avoiding Questions with Negative Connotations


To avoid making a bad impression at your interview, Daniel suggests thinking about the connotations behind each of the questions that you’re asking before you ask them. Here are three questions that tend to leave a bad taste in interviewers’ mouths, she says:
“A valid question, yes, but if you ask it too soon, it might appear that you are more concerned about the work schedule than you are about the actual work,” says Daniel.
“Telecommuting can be a positive thing for both the job seeker and the company, but your timing in asking this question is critical,” Daniel explains. “If asked too soon, it will convey a lack of enthusiasm for getting to know the team and work environment. Demonstrate your interest in the role and potential contributions to the company before inquiring about telecommuting/flex-time, etc.”
“A desire to grow in the organization is admirable,” says Daniel. “But if you’re asking this question early on in the interview process, the interviewer may question your genuine interest in the position you’ve applied for. Frame the question in a way that demonstrates both your long-term commitment to the company and your professional growth.”
  • Could you tell me about your work/life balance policy?
  • Is there a possibility I could work remotely?
  • How long do people typically stay in this position before they move on the next role?
Jodi Sonoda
 


Jodi has been blogging for over 3 years, and is excited to currently be blogging with Beyond.com for collegejobbank.com. She is a motivational speaker, mini-biographer and the founder of The 5 Dollar Project. The most important part of her life is her beautiful 3 year old daughter.
 
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