Protecting Yourself from Work-from-Home Scams

Posted by in Career Advice

As the Internet becomes more popular, there are increasing opportunities to not only become employed by this medium, but also work from home while doing so. However, not every online opportunity is trustworthy. There are tons of scam artists ready to take advantage of the naïve.

This is not to say that there aren’t any legitimate work-from-home jobs. You just have to learn how to catch the signs of a scam artist. So before you begin your search for an at-home job, let’s explore the ways you can protect yourself from being scammed.

Don’t Give Out Too Much Personal Information

Handing out personal information over the Internet has always been a no-no. And the same goes for applying for jobs. There will be many scammers out there asking for social security information, date of birth, and more. But don’t give out anything until you’re sure you’re communicating with a legitimate company.

Also, you’ll want to be careful not to hand out your credit card information. This is especially true if an “employer” is asking you to pay for supplies or other information before they will accept you for a position. Legitimate companies or opportunities will treat you no differently than those that can be found in an office. In other words, you should not be asked to pay money in order to obtain a position. So be careful before you disclose anything too personal about yourself until the nameless, faceless entity on the other side of your computer is represented by a legitimate person or business.

Conduct a Thorough Background Check

Background checks are particularly important when searching for employment online. Again, you cannot see the representative on the other end of the computer and therefore should take extra measures to ensure the opportunity is real. One way you can get this done is by asking for a list of other employees or contractors that have worked for them to get more insight into who this company is.

Also, you can take advantage of websites that are dedicated to catching scam artists, such as ScamBusters.org. And you can also check with the Better Business Bureau to see if a company is legitimate. However, it will be more difficult to catch online scammers in this way because they don’t have to register as a business in order to act as one.

Use Your Common Sense

One thing you have on your side when searching for a job is common sense. It may take a while to develop online common sense, but it will come. This way, if an individual or company claims that you can make $5,000 a week stuffing envelopes from home, you’ll know it’s probably too good to be true. The same goes for unsolicited emails saying that someone has found a job for you. In time, you’ll automatically delete them and know you’ve probably been placed on a 3rd party mailing list with thousands of others who have been offered the same “job.”

Finding a legitimate work-from-home job opportunity can be very rewarding. However, to avoid getting caught up in the scams, try to conduct plenty of research and use your common sense. This way, you can avoid the nonsense and get straight to finding your perfect at-home job.

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  • Butch
    Butch
    Stay with this guys, you're helping a lot of people.
  • Jannika
    Jannika
    You've solved all my problems
  • Lettie
    Lettie
    Thanks for posting!
  • Winter
    Winter
    It's good to see the logic set out so well.
  • Lorren
    Lorren
    That's the best answer of all time!
  • Carli
    Carli
    Kudos! What a neat way of thinking about it.
  • Janeece
    Janeece
    Thanks for sharing. Always good to find a real expert.
  • Jani-King scam
    Jani-King scam
    I think another good tip to avoid scam companies is to contact people who already worked for any company that you feel is scamming you!
  • Jani-King scam
    Jani-King scam
    All I have to say is that I do agree with this article, especially with the part that talks about BackGround Check.When you think you are in front of a scam, do some deep research and discover if the company that contacted you or that you contacted is a scam or not.
  •  Brad
    Brad
    Thanks for the great content. I'm always searching the net for content that will give me some new ideas for my own blogs. Great blog and thanks for the great article.
  •  Brad
    Brad
    Thanks for the great content. I'm always searching the net for content that will give me some new ideas for my own blogs and legitimate online businesses.

    Great blog and thanks for the great article.

    Brad
  •  Brad
    Brad
    Thanks for the great content. I'm always searching the net for content that will give me some new ideas for my own blogs and legitimate home business opportunities. Thanks for the great article.Brad
  •  Brad
    Brad
    Thanks for the great content. I'm always searching the net for content that will give me some new ideas for my own blogs and legitimate home businesses. Thanks for the great article.Brad
  • Dennis
    Dennis
    Thanks for the great content and information on legitimate home business opportunities.  I searched the net looking for this type of content to give me ideas on future articles that I am going to write on this same general subject.  Appreciate reading your article and information on this particular subject.
  • Dennis
    Dennis
    Thanks for the great content and information on legitimate online businesses.  I search the net looking for this type of content to give me ideas on future articles that I am going to write on this same general subject.  Appreciate reading your article and information on this particular subject.
  • Brinn Hemmingson
    Brinn Hemmingson
    Scams...google treasure.  I answered several of those I Make 500 a week sleeping and it was a scam.  Said $2.00 shipping, but $72 after 30 days.  Got docked for $72 in THREE DAYS.  I DID get my money back.  Wise idea - EVERY thing you see for Work at home, check on scams FIRST. I had FOUR scam attempts.
  • Callie
    Callie
    Hey Heather,Great article!When protecting ourselves against scam (of any kind), one can never have TMI (too much information).  Your tips are outlined very well, and should be followed to the letter!Like you, I too like to do my part to help others.  For your readers, I’d like to share a few scam fighting resources that can definitely be used in conjunction with your article content.Sites like www.WorkAtHomeNoScams.com/2007/05/16/work-at-home-scams/, www.RatRaceRebellion.com, and www.WorkAtHomeCareers.com/scams.shtml have all captured the media's attention in terms of continually providing helpful scam awareness tips, information, and legitimate home employment.  It gives me such a good feeling when sources are working together for the same worthy cause.  I'm hoping many have been and will be helped via your article.  Thanks for writing it!Much success to all those seeking credible work from home.  :)
  • Jeff Paul Scam
    Jeff Paul Scam
    Good post, your post could really help me in my work. Hopefully this will help increase my traffic more. Thanks for sharing.
  • Marcia Robinson
    Marcia Robinson
    You are right on target here Heather.  People just need to be reminded to be cautious since there are always people bent on taking advantage of those who are in need or anxious.Those of us in this profession have to be willing to speak up about the fraud and scams on the market.  Thanks.
  • Andy
    Andy
    Some wise words indeed .. it is very easy to get drawn in to such schemes, just use common sense.. if it seems too good to be true it usually is.
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